Category Archives: Notes

The 6 Biggest Email Marketing Myths

Episode 293 | The 6 Biggest Email Marketing Myths

Date: 2016-06-14

Link: Startups for the Rest of Us

 

Startups for the Rest of UsMondays and Fridays are typically not good days to send email.

Entrepreneurs tend to check their email on the weekend. People and large corporations tend not to check their email on the weekend.

If you send on Tuesday then you are probably getting lost in all of the other email marketers who send on Tuesdays.

(Email length) depends so much on your visitors and prospects.

Have shorter emails that are good on mobile when you are first engaging with someone. Pack short, powerful stuff in the getting acquainted emails.

You have to have a minimum number of characters that conveys what the email is about.

Make sure you are building your list fast enough that having an expected unsubscribe rate is something you can overcome.

Have really nice plain text looking emails.

Moving from One-time to Subscription Revenue, When Your Core Product Has Variable Costs, and More Listener Questions

Episode 292 | Moving from One-time to Subscription Revenue, When Your Core Product Has Variable Costs, and More Listener Questions

Date: 2016-06-07

Link: Startups for the Rest of Us

 

Startups for the Rest of UsIt is easier and easier to build cool tools but the performance implications of those as you scale up is a real thing.

B2C tends to be a tougher market (than B2B).

You can get $0.10 clicks on Facebook with retargeting.

Even with 500 uniques a month you can get some retargeting.

You have a problem if people are leaving after seven seconds.

These days you’re going to have to do everything under the sun that doesn’t scale just to get people using your app.

Your mailing list is an asset. As asset doesn’t build itself overnight.

Get in one-on-one conversations and figure out if people can use (your product).

Selling subscriptions in WordPress is very difficult as people are not used to it.

It takes you years to get through the long, slow SaaS ramp of death.

Try to get to between $2,000 and $5,000 a month as soon as possible.

Freemium, Asking for CC Up-front, and a Big Mistake First-time Founders Make (with Guest David Cancel)

Episode 291 | Freemium, Asking for CC Up-front, and a Big Mistake First-time Founders Make (with Guest David Cancel)

Date: 2016-05-31

Link: Startups for the Rest of Us

 

Startups for the Rest of UsDon’t try to be too clever. You’ll just end up confusing people.

Approach a market when there is a shift that allows you to redefine a market.

The way you sell to a customer and support a customer has to change.

The bigger hits are the differentiator these days because there is so many high-quality hits coming out.

Public Speaking as a Sales Channel with Rachel Andrew

Episode 290 | Public Speaking as a Sales Channel with Rachel Andrew

Date: 2016-05-24

Link: Startups for the Rest of Us

 

Startups for the Rest of UsSpeaking enables you to meet your customers.

It gets easier to get speaking engagements over time. They naturally build on one another.

Write the abstract before writing the talk.

If you are good as a speaker you get more requests than you ever do and at that point it becomes part of your income.

Making your presentation look good matters to some extent.

Make sure the travel (for conferences) doesn’t negatively affect your business.

A Short Guide to Online Presales for SaaS & Software

Episode 289 | A Short Guide to Online Presales for SaaS & Software

Date: 2016-05-17

Link: Startups for the Rest of Us

 

Startups for the Rest of UsYou don’t want to sell a product to somebody who won’t benefit from it.

If you have a lot of people you might want to qualify them before the demo. If you don’t have a lot of people to qualify you can do the demo first and then qualify them at the end.

You want to gather feedback to use for your future efforts.

If you have a high price point product, or it is complicated, or it integrates with a customer’s integral process, doing a customized demo will likely work better than them going directly to a trial.

Try to find out what the people that are coming to you most want and then try to guide them down that path.

The people that are going to pay you a lot of money are going to be the ones that are tech savvy and further along.

How to Choose and Test a Paid Marketing Channel

Episode 288 | How to Choose and Test a Paid Marketing Channel

Date: 2016-05-10

Link: Startups for the Rest of Us

 

Startups for the Rest of UsAs ad platforms get more mature (e.g. Adwords) they get way more expensive and there is no way you are going to make them work.

Be realistic in how much time you have to run ads (tests).

Don’t spend a lot of time trying to figure out what the single best ad is. Take three to five of them and test them. See what the results are.

There is a lot more B2C inventory than B2B. B2C is lower quality.

If you can find an outlier ad network, and you can make it work, the clicks are going to be super cheap and it is going to be very, very lucrative for you.

5 High Leverage Areas Bootstrappers Should Focus On

Episode 287 | 5 High Leverage Areas Bootstrappers Should Focus On

Date: 2016-05-03

Link: Startups for the Rest of Us

 

Startups for the Rest of UsMake sure you are spending time in the right places and not overworking yourself.

You have to be thinking out three to six months.

Make sure your team understands the vision and where the company is headed.

As you get larger a given channel might now work as well for you as it did in the past.

You want to think of ways to get your customers better results.

Be able to balance the talent you are hiring with the cashflow of the business.

Five Guidelines for Balancing Learning and Doing

Episode 286 | Five Guidelines for Balancing Learning and Doing

Date: 2016-04-26

Link: Startups for the Rest of Us

 

Startups for the Rest of UsLearning can be a major timesuck that masks itself as productivity.

Embrace just-in-time learning. Pick the task at hand then go out and learn everything about it.

Learning is the easy part.

Consciously cap your consumption (of learning).

Balance learning with inspiration.

You can’t use inspiration as a crutch.

How to Make Your First Hire

Episode 285 | How to Make Your First Hire

Date: 2016-04-19

Link: Startups for the Rest of Us

 

Startups for the Rest of UsStay with part-time and contractors as long as you can.

Find people that are really good at a single skill and then fire yourself from the job they are doing.

Hiring is a learned skill.

Interview multiple candidates.

A bad hire is orders of magnitude worse than no hire.

Experienced people are a lot more expensive but they can hit the ground running.

Going from zero to one employees is the hardest.

As your budget grows you can hire better people.

Being a manger is a learned skill.

For full-time employees hire for the most time-consuming task you are doing first.

Hire for support first.

Really good hires typically aren’t looking for jobs.

Key Takeaways from MicroConf 2016

Episode 284 | Key Takeaways from MicroConf 2016

Date: 2016-04-12

Link: Startups for the Rest of Us

 

Startups for the Rest of UsThe hallway (conversations) are as valuable as the notes from the talks.

The first thing you should think about in your development cycle is improving a feature. The second one is getting more people to use that feature. The third thing is getting people to use that feature more often. The fourth thing is to build another feature.

Think about how you can gain trust rather than get more money.

Unfair advantages:

  • Be early to a space
  • Who you know (your network)
  • Who knows you (your audience)
  • Growth expertise

Flip-flopping between funding and bootstrapping for the same business is bad because the priorities are so different.

Have world-class churn (2-3% range) before you scale.

If you are above 10% (in churn) then your business is no fire. (not in a good way)